The work of war poet Wilfred Owen to be read by St Helens actor Phil Gwilliam on New Brighton Station

Phil Gwilliam and Wilfred Owen

Phil Gwilliam and Wilfred Owen

First published in News
Last updated
by , Senior Reporter

THE work of war poet Wilfred Owen will resonate with train passengers this weekend when St Helens actor Phil Gwilliam recites his moving passages on New Brighton Station.

Phil who portrayed the poet in the West End production Bullets and Daffodils will be giving the readings including Anthem for Doomed Youth, Futility and Dulce et Decorum Est between 10am and noon.

It is a station Shropshire born Wilfred, who spent time living in Birkenhead, would have used many times and is the first in a series of events taking place on platforms across Merseyside.

Comments (3)

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3:23pm Wed 6 Aug 14

Geoffrey Moore says...

Wilfred Owen was not born in Birkenhead. He was born in Plas Wilmot, Weston Lane, Nr Oswestry, Shropshire on 18 March 1893. The family moved to Birkenhead in 1897 and moved back to Oswestry in 1907. Wilfred was killed in action on 4 November 1918, 7 days before the War ended.

Geoff Moore Leeds
Wilfred Owen was not born in Birkenhead. He was born in Plas Wilmot, Weston Lane, Nr Oswestry, Shropshire on 18 March 1893. The family moved to Birkenhead in 1897 and moved back to Oswestry in 1907. Wilfred was killed in action on 4 November 1918, 7 days before the War ended. Geoff Moore Leeds Geoffrey Moore
  • Score: 5

11:31am Sat 9 Aug 14

Lurkinhead says...

I just hope that this initiative is genuine in its motives (in which case, fair play!) and not some desperate attempt to drum up support for a tawdry failed business venture that shall remain nameless.
I just hope that this initiative is genuine in its motives (in which case, fair play!) and not some desperate attempt to drum up support for a tawdry failed business venture that shall remain nameless. Lurkinhead
  • Score: 2

11:36am Sat 9 Aug 14

Lurkinhead says...

Here is a typical review of Bullets and Daffodils:

"The mark of a strong and lasting relationship is that one is prepared to forgive any transgressions and moments of weakness. It’s a rule that holds just as true for us lovers of theatre, but she can sometimes be a trying mistress.

On paper this musical interpretation of Wilfred Owen’s war poetry seems to have a lot going for it: musical contributions from Pink Floyd’s Dave Gilmour, script contributions by David Quantick and a narration by Christopher Timothy — albeit disembodied.

Owen’s story itself is a compelling tale. Forced to move from a comfortable house owned by his grandfather to the rougher area of Birkenhead, the young Owen showed determination, driven by his strong religious faith, to better himself. After a period of working as a teacher, he enrolled in the army and was soon plunged into battle in the First World War. The horrors he witnessed and experienced in the trenches inspired a body of work that now marks him as probably the greatest of the war poets.

Writer and director Dean Johnson’s play even makes quite a promising start with a title song performed by Lindsay Field that has a nice turn of phrase and infectious chorus.

Sadly after that the whole things goes rapidly downhill. Despite the best efforts of Chloe Torpey as Owen’s mother, what should be a heart-rending tale fails to engage either on a dramatic or emotional level. Unmemorable song follows unmemorable song until the brief sixty-minute running time begins to feel as long as the war itself.

Charlotte Roberts contributes choreography of little relevance that falls somewhat uneasily between contemporary dance and mime and only succeeds in tipping the whole affair into a rather embarrassing pretentiousness.

The life and work of Wilfred Owen has the potential to make a gripping and emotive piece of theatre, sadly this isn’t it.

Directed by Dean Johnson
Written by Dean Johnson
Music by Dean Johnson

Additional script contributions from David Quantick and Paolo Hewitt

Additional music by David Gilmour

Cast
Susan Owen​Chloe Torpey
The Figure​Charlotte Roberts
The Singer​Lindsay Field
Featured narration​Christop
her Timothy
The Homeless Veteran​Dean Johnson"

Source: http://www.westendwi
lma.com/bullets-daff
odils/
Here is a typical review of Bullets and Daffodils: "The mark of a strong and lasting relationship is that one is prepared to forgive any transgressions and moments of weakness. It’s a rule that holds just as true for us lovers of theatre, but she can sometimes be a trying mistress. On paper this musical interpretation of Wilfred Owen’s war poetry seems to have a lot going for it: musical contributions from Pink Floyd’s Dave Gilmour, script contributions by David Quantick and a narration by Christopher Timothy — albeit disembodied. Owen’s story itself is a compelling tale. Forced to move from a comfortable house owned by his grandfather to the rougher area of Birkenhead, the young Owen showed determination, driven by his strong religious faith, to better himself. After a period of working as a teacher, he enrolled in the army and was soon plunged into battle in the First World War. The horrors he witnessed and experienced in the trenches inspired a body of work that now marks him as probably the greatest of the war poets. Writer and director Dean Johnson’s play even makes quite a promising start with a title song performed by Lindsay Field that has a nice turn of phrase and infectious chorus. Sadly after that the whole things goes rapidly downhill. Despite the best efforts of Chloe Torpey as Owen’s mother, what should be a heart-rending tale fails to engage either on a dramatic or emotional level. Unmemorable song follows unmemorable song until the brief sixty-minute running time begins to feel as long as the war itself. Charlotte Roberts contributes choreography of little relevance that falls somewhat uneasily between contemporary dance and mime and only succeeds in tipping the whole affair into a rather embarrassing pretentiousness. The life and work of Wilfred Owen has the potential to make a gripping and emotive piece of theatre, sadly this isn’t it. Directed by Dean Johnson Written by Dean Johnson Music by Dean Johnson Additional script contributions from David Quantick and Paolo Hewitt Additional music by David Gilmour Cast Susan Owen​Chloe Torpey The Figure​Charlotte Roberts The Singer​Lindsay Field Featured narration​Christop her Timothy The Homeless Veteran​Dean Johnson" Source: http://www.westendwi lma.com/bullets-daff odils/ Lurkinhead
  • Score: 6

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